What is the responsiveness and respondent burden of the new Knee Society score?

May 3, 2017

Source:  Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 2017, 4th April [epub]

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Date of publication: April 2017

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: In this longitudinal study, the new Knee Society score (NKSS) was evaluated for its responsiveness and respondent burden. A cohort of 148 patients who had undergone total knee arthroplasty by the same surgeon were assessed using the NKSS and other scores.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes:  You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article.  Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text.  Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Similar migration in computer-assisted and conventional total knee arthroplasty

December 23, 2016

Source:  Acta Orthopaedica, 20th December 2016 [epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication: December 2016

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: The role of computer navigation in total knee arthroplasty is still under debate. This study used radiostereometric analysis in a randomised controlled trial to determine if there were any differences between computer-assisted surgery and conventionally operated total knee arthroplasty in migration of the tibial component.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes:  You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article.  Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text.  Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Patient-specific instrumentation does not improve radiographic alignment or clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty

July 21, 2016

Source:  Acta Orthopaedica 2016, June 1 [epub]

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Date of publication: June 2016

Publication type: Systematic review

In a nutshell: This meta-analysis involved 21 randomised controlled trials which compared patient-specific and conventional instrumentation. The study found that hospital stay was shortened by 8 hours and there was a reduction in the number of surgical trays used. However, it concluded that patient-specific instrumentation did not result in clinically-meaningful improvement in alignment, fewer outliers or better early patient-reported outcome measures.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes:  You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article.  Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text.  Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Outcomes of a newer-generation cementless total knee arthroplasty design

October 22, 2015

Source:  Orthopedics, 2015, 38 (10) p. 620-624

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Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: There is little published in the literature about the clinical and radiological outcomes of newer designs of cementless total knee arthroplasties. The authors of this study evaluated implant survivorship, range of motion, pain and functional outcomes, as well as the incidence of postoperative complications at short-term follow-up

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes:  You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article.  Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text.  Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Analysis of early postoperative pain in the first and second knee in staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty

June 18, 2015

Source:  PLoS One, 2015, 10 (6)

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Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This retrospective controlled study of patients receiving staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) found that patients experienced greater postoperative pain within 48 hours of the operation on the second knee. The authors state that this provides clinical evidence for enhancing the analgesic strategy in the second operation. They also recommend allowing more than six months between operations, in order to reduce postoperative pain in the second knee, speed up the rehabilitation process and improve patient satisfaction.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes:  You will need an NHS Athens username and password to access this article.  Please contact your local NHS library if you cannot access the full text.  Follow this link to find your local NHS library.